OCT 11
09.00-15.30
Antwerp Expo

Novel technologies are spurred by commercial innovation & private initiatives. Reduced costs, advanced technologies and materials have turned space into an economical hotspot for entrepreneurial spirits, becoming even more accessible to diverse industries and even ... citizens.
Thanks to reusable rockets, smaller satellites and reliable soft- and hardware sectors such as satellite production, communications and geospatial intelligence is booming with a 100-fold growth of private investments in the last years (from 100 million in 2010 to 12 billion in 2021). Between 1970 and 2000, launching a satellite into space cost around 18.500 USD per kilogram. Today, that number has plummeted to 2.720 USD per kilogram. The contemporary low Earth orbit (LEO) satellites are smaller, have superior onboard computing power and are manufactured with cost effective standards. Since SpaceX’s milestone of the Falcon 9 rocket returning to base, ready for reflight, the company developed even a “rideshare” program allowing small operators to co-send a satellite into orbit for ‘only’ 1 million USD. AI, advanced sensors and quantum computing are providing a tsunami of geo-spatial & deep space data boosting hundreds of new tech companies with cutting edge solutions in geo-positioning, navigation, real estate and agricultural applications. As space tech investment opportunities (terrestrial, orbital, and exploratory domains) already encompass an estimated 200+ billion USD market, the universe seems not the exclusive playground of science fiction storytellers or blurred scientists. The increasing amounts of capital and experience is piling up and giving birth to new space ventures that open unseen doors: in-space manufacturing, in space compilation of larger infrastructures, commercial space stations, first steps into the exploration of asteroid mining, quantum security, space cleantech, space cleantech / debris collection, space tourism, new types of propulsion, prototypes Mars bases, hypersonic travel a.o.    

Space has a vital role in climate analysis as it is the only observatory from where we can predict earth’s climate response to human-induced change. In this new era of space-based technologies, remotely sensed data allow us to keep a close watch on the current and future impact from greenhouse gases  and aerosols and their impact on water cycles, air quality, forests and other aspects of our environment.

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The launch sector is on fire. Large amounts of capital are being pumped in as the increased commercial interest in space is resulting with more satellites entering orbit each year. Experts estimate that nearly 1.000 satellites will be launched into orbit each year during the 2020s, building up to 15.000 satellites by 2028. This will allow access to more data than ever before.

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